China Passes National Security Law

By , July 1, 2015

Ready for National Security!

Within a day of its publication of the second Draft Foreign NGO Law on May 5, the Chinese government also published for comment a Draft National Security Law.  Today, that document became law. Although criticized for its vagueness and breadth, the passed law is still just as broad if not more so.  The new law also covers protection of seabeds and adds the word “extremism” to the provision on terrorism (Article 28), a provision that immediately follows the one that protects “normal religious activity” and calls for the opposition to foreign influences and interference in domestic religious affairs (Article 27).

The law itself comes off more as abstract principles. But make no mistake, the Chinese government and the Public Security Bureau which has oversight of the Law, means business.  The fact that they elevated this abstract document to the level of a law is a telling sign and foreign governments should be looking at it carefully.

The full English translation of the National Security Law has been published at China Law Translate and can be found here.

5 Responses to “China Passes National Security Law”

  1. […] Zheng Shuna, deputy director of the legislative affairs commission of the National People’s Congress, a pro forma legislature, gave an unambiguous definition of the phrase at a news conference on Wednesday, while tying the national security law to the defense of those interests. […]

  2. […] Zheng Shuna, deputy director of the legislative affairs commission of the National People’s Congress, a pro forma legislature, gave an unambiguous definition of the phrase at a news conference on Wednesday, while tying the national security law to the defense of those interests. […]

  3. […] Zheng Shuna, deputy director of the legislative affairs commission of the National People’s Congress, a pro forma legislature, gave an unambiguous definition of the phrase at a news conference on Wednesday, while tying the national security law to the defense of those interests. […]

  4. […] Zheng Shuna, deputy director of the legislative affairs commission of the National People’s Congress, a pro forma legislature, gave an unambiguous definition of the phrase at a news conference on Wednesday, while tying the national security law to the defense of those interests. […]

  5. […] Zheng Shuna, deputy director of the legislative affairs commission of the National People’s Congress, a pro forma legislature, gave an unambiguous definition of the phrase at a news conference on Wednesday, while tying the national security law to the defense of those interests. […]

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