Posts tagged: Chinese New year

恭喜发财!Happy Year of the Snake!

By , February 9, 2013

Happy Year of the Snake!

Sunday starts a new lunar year and with it, brings a new zodiac sign to rule the planet – the snake.  Fortunately for the snake, it doesn’t get the same bad rap in Asia that it gets in the West.  In Asia, snakes are often viewed as “little dragons” with a bit more of a calm and calculating personality.  Snakes are considered intelligent, stylish, and passionate but at times complex and unscrupulous.  It is said that a home with a person born in the year of the snake will never go hungry, perhaps relying on the ingenuity of the snake.

Like the creature itself, Year of the Snake proves elusive in its predictions with the last two snake years – 1989 and 2001 – providing major changes to the world order, the Tian’anmen Square protests and the World Trade Center attacks, respectively.  Major change is not surprising in a year governed by an animal that sheds its skin.

But what could make the 2013 Year of the Snake even more tumultuous is that the year element – water – and the animal element – for snakes, fire – are in conflict.  Water is considered a destroyer of fire, putting the two in a constant struggle. The only aspect of the snake and water that aren’t in conflict is the ability to make money.  Snakes are considered good at making money and water is the natural element of money.

How will you do this year?  Check out your personal horoscope here (note you may have to do a Bazi test to determine the strength of your birth year element.  You can do that here – note that birth date is entered day-month-year).

All this uncertainty brought on by the Water Snake is stressful, but have no fear, the Year of the Snake has its very own cocktail!  Detailed-oriented and elegant like the snake, this cocktail should help you get through what could be a challenging year.

Whatever this year might bring, we wish our Asian friends a happy, healthy and prosperous new year!  恭喜发财! (Gong Xi Fa Cai – pronounced gung-see-fa-tsai).  Those looking to ring in the new year with some music, check out the video below.

恭喜发财!Enter Year of the Dragon!

By , January 22, 2012

Happy Lunar New Year!

The metal rabbit did not disappoint in its tumultuous nature.  With the rabbit’s fixed element – wood – doing constant battle with 2011’s year-element, metal, the mid-east uprisings, the fall of governments, the Fukushima disaster, and the Occupy Wall Street movement should not have come as a surprise.

But come Monday, we say goodbye to the metal rabbit for another 60 years and welcome the water dragon.  For the first time in many years, the animal’s fixed element – here wood – is not in conflict with the year-element, water.  In fact, water nourishes wood, doubling the impact of any events set to occur in 2012 – both good and bad.

While the dragon is an auspicious sign, signifying power and fortune, it is also a volatile one.  As a result, 2012 will be a transformative year, with major and powerful shifts in the world.  At this stage it is unclear if these shifts will be good or bad, but with the water dragon, they will happen (although in the last year of the water dragon, 1952, nothing big really happened unless you consider the coronation of Queen Elizabeth a big deal).

How will you do this year?  Check out your personal horoscope here (note you may have to do a Bazi test to determine the strength of your birth year element.  You can do that here).

The only think that we perhaps know for certain is that birthrates will rise in Chinese countries.  Because of the auspicious nature of the dragon and the fact that, given its celestial nature, it has long represented the emperor, many couples seek to have a baby born in the dragon year.  In China, when you only get one bite at the apple in having a baby, why not try to make it a dragon baby!

At any rate, have a happy, healthy and prosperous new year no matter your sign!

恭喜发财!

(Gong Xi Fa Cai – pronounced gong see fa tsai)

恭喜发财! Happy New Year!

By , February 13, 2010

tigerWelcome to the Year of the Tiger!  February 14 marks the start of the new year for China as well as most other East Asian countries.   Tiger years are never dull and are often marked by huge and dramatic changes, both for individuals and for the world-at-large.  So if you thought 2009 was a bit of a roller coaster, you haven’t seen anything yet.   It’s generally not a year to be asleep at the wheel and you should seek to take advantage of every opportunity.

But to know what is really in store for you, you need to first know your own Chinese zodiac sign.  Each animal in the zodiac fares differently in the Year of the Tiger.  Click here to learn your sign and learn your fortune for 2010.

The Lunar New Year, also known as Chun Jie (the Spring Festival) in China is a 15-day holiday, when Chinese from the cities will return to their parents’ homes in the countryside and families spend the most of that time together.   The New Year is the most important holiday in the Chinese calander.

To all of our Chinese and East Asian friends, Gong Xi Fa Cai (pronounced Gong See Fa Tsai)!  May your new year be filled with family, fortune and luck!

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